The Bygone Collection – UPVC Sliding Sash Windows

Authentic Timber Effect UPVC Sash Windows in Conservation Areas

A replacement window made from modern materials such as UPVC may seem to fly in the face of history, however today more conservation officers and planning inspectors are convinced by Bygone sash windows because of their looks, but also because they can exceed the demands of energy efficiency, security and recycleability.

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When most hear the words “UPVC” they instinctively think of the thousands of casement windows that were installed in the early 1980’s when double glazing first became popular. This has damaged the charm and character of many buildings.

“The Bygone collection appears to replicate a traditional sash window very closely. The effect is so convincing that it is difficult to differentiate between the two (timber original) even at close quarters.”

Inspector from the office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

So authentic is the effect that a senior planner standing just feet away from a Bygone sash window actually said, “I don’t want timber – I want a UPVC sash window”, he couldn’t believe his eyes seeing our white acrylic timber finish!

On occasion timber sash windows are the only accepted replacement material. The Bygone Collection can provide these too with enhanced thermal efficiency and greater security than the original sashes.

TRUST SOUTH LAKES WINDOWS LTD for stunning PVCu sash windows

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Double Glazing & Listed Buildings

Masterframe – Bygone Collection Professional Testimonials

“The window appears to replicate a traditional sliding sash window very closely. The effect is so convincing that it is difficult to differentiate between the two (original wooden sash and Bygone window) even at close quarters”.
Planning inspector, Bristol Council
“We used Masterframe Windows as they are better value than hardwood, but give the same appearance. The windows have a deep bottom rail and glazing bar with a unique continuous horn, which Masterframe clearly spent a lot of time and effort on, making it the best feature”.
Senior Technical Officer, Wigan council
“The replacement units are made of U-PVC but are of a high quality design which accurately replicates the style and painted timber finish of the existing single glazed timber units. From the submitted material by the applicant, it is considered that the replacement window would preserve the traditional character of the building and conservation area”.
Conservation Officer, London Borough of Haringey, Clyde Circus Conservation Area
“Having reviewed therefore with the sample, I am content that these windows would be of a similar appearance to the original wood windows. Therefore the replacement of the windows with those I viewed (i.e. the timber effect graining) would be permitted, and planning permission would not be required”.
Senior Planning Officer, The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea

Masterframe – Bygone Collection – Before and After Examples

Listed Buildings

The Grades in England are I, II* and II. The buildings are graded to show their relative architectural or historic interest:

  • Grade I buildings are of an exceptional historic architectural interest
  • Grade II* are particularly important buildings of more than a special interest
  • Grade II are of special interest, warranting every effort to preserve them
  • Article 4 (2) Direction can be introduced by the local planning authority and it is to encourage the retention of the high quality features of buildings in the Conservation Area. Planning permission will be required for a number of changes including windows and doors.
  • Article 4 (1) Direction can be introduced by the local planning authority but requires to be approved by the government. Planning permission will be required for a number of changes including windows and doors.

Listing currently protects approximately 500,000 buildings, of which the majority – over 90% – are Grade II. Grade I and II* buildings may be eligible for English Heritage grants for urgent major repairs. You are extremely unlikely to get any form of grant for a Grade II listed building.

Listed Building Consent

Anyone who wants to demolish a listed building, or to alter or extend one in any way that affects its character, must obtain “listed building consent” from the local planning authority. It is an offence to demolish, alter or extend a listed building without listed building consent.

Appeals

If an application for listed building consent is refused, or granted subject to conditions, the applicant has the right to appeal to the Secretary of State. The procedure for appealing is virtually identical to the procedure for appealing against a refusal of planning permission. The applicant can include, as one of the grounds of appeal, an argument that the building is not of a special architectural or historic interest and ought not to be listed.

VAT

Some listed building enjoy a more favourable position on the payment of VAT on works than unlisted buildings. Alterations to non business listed buildings are not subject to VAT as long as work is carried out by a VAT registered builder and with listed building consent. This relief only applies to qualifying listed buildings carried out with the appropriate consent.

Listed building and conservation area case studies…

Article 4 (2) listed, Guildford Council

A council objected to 6 Bygone sash windows (PVCu) being installed whilst the work was on site.
The installation company being told to immediately withdraw from site before replacing any other windows. The property was Article 4 directive and the appropriate planning permissions had not been obtained.

Here the council had a ban on PVCu, it was their policy that PVCu was not suitable for conservation areas especially Article 4 directives. Again the owner felt the council’s refusal was unfair and objected to the notice, even though they hadn’t obtained the correct prior consent.

Situated in a Conservation Area, a semi-detached two storey property the owners sought to replace the existing timber sash windows with PVCU grain effect sash windows to front elevation (Article 4 (2) Direction). The council felt the proposed windows did not preserve or enhance the
buildings appearance and would detract from the character of the Conservation Area.

The windows proposed, copy the sash styling and consist of modern PVCu double-glazed units furnished with modern float and not traditional glass. The company range is from the ‘Bygone’ range of vertical sliding white wood effect PVCu windows which have been developed to match
original timber sash windows.

Clearly the authority was satisfied the owners did in fact care for the appearance as much as they, as they go on to say;

This case is finely balanced in that the applicants have clearly researched the matter and chosen a product that tries to replicate the appearance of timber sash windows. This is recognised and welcomed. However there is no escaping the fact that these windows are not timber and are in fact plastic windows.

The case officer has visited the site on several occasions and is satisfied that in this case a refusal could not be sustained as it will ultimately be difficult to distinguish between timber and PVCu because of the quality of the window type and design proposed.

The article 4 direction provides control over such matters, however the applicant has acknowledged the Conservation Area Status and controls exercised by the article 4(2) direction by choosing a superior plastic window which successfully imitates the timber sash design and on that basis the application should be supported.

Sash windows in conservation areas - BEFORE

Before

Sash windows in conservation areas - AFTER

After

Civic Award for restoration, Wigan Council

There are councils who seek to conserve the heritage of an area, one such council is Wigan.

Here they took a run down part of town, and restored it to its former glory. Their brief was to improve the lives of their tenants whilst retaining the character of the neighbourhood. Over the years you can imagine, every type, style and colour of poor plastic, aluminum, and yes even poorly designed timber windows had been fitted, it was a complete mish mash of fenestration.

Seeking to restore the Victorian feel to their properties, they installed over 100 PVCu sash windows with the latest thermal efficient glazing and acoustic glass for the benefit of the home owners on main roads.

Not only were the residents delighted their refurbished homes were energy efficient, secure and wholly in keeping with the Victorian era, Wigan themselves won civic awards for the improvement scheme. As their Senior Technical Officer said;

“We used Masterframe Windows as they are better value than hardwood, but give the same appearance. The windows have a deep bottom rail and glazing bar and a unique continuous horn, which Masterframe clearly spent a lot of time and effort on, making it the best feature on the Vintage collection. It is an excellent product, with very positive feedback from customers”

Sash window installation - Wigan, Lancashire

After

Sash window installation - Wigan, Lancashire

After

World Heritage site, Conwy Castle

When the owners of a Bed & Breakfast considered replacement windows their planners were naturally interested in the proposal especially as the property stands within the walls of Conwy Castle, a World Heritage site in Wales.

Having seen the sample and much careful consideration, they approved the installation of our sash windows.

Once installed, the owners said, “they’re superb, they’re really keeping with the original Victorian style, and we’re amazed with the noise reduction” (as it’s on a busy main road) and their guests noticed “how much warmer the place felt”.

The sash windows in the property on the right retains the traditional feel, in stark contrast to the unauthorized replacement of unsympathetic casements next door (left) which are clearly out of character.

Sash windows in listed buildings

World Heritage Site

Article 4 directive.

The council had an eyesore of a building. Some years before owners had installed wholly inappropriate aluminum sash windows into the existing box frames. These ruined the aesthetics of the property and its surrounding neighbourhood.

Masterframe sash windows (PVCu) were however approved as suitable replacements, as they matched the existing timber sash windows. The property in question is photographed here, and hopefully illustrates the authenticity previously described.

Yet this approval does not extend to the remaining sash windows in the same property, consequently part of the home is warm, energy efficient and secure, the remainder isn’t!

PVCu windows in the same building as timber originals…..spot the difference!

Conservation area sash windows

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For more Bygone Collection info - Contact us NOW... It's EASY!

Call FREEPHONE 0800 917 6066 and speak to one of our super helpful staff RIGHT NOW! (Office Hours)
…Or simply use our online contact form and we will respond ASAP!
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UPVC Double Glazing in Conservation Areas